Office of Institutional Research reveals retention rates for black males down, not up

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Despite earlier reports to the contrary, retention rates for African American males at DePauw have decreased over the last decade.

Hermen Diaz, assistant director of Multicultural Student Services, was quoted in the Feb. 24 issue of The DePauw, saying that retention rates for black males were increasing. At the time, he couldn't find the exact numbers.

The DePauw learned that statement was incorrect after receiving information from the Office of Institutional Research. Diaz could not be reached for comment in time for publication.

From 1997 to 2007, the rate of retention for African American males saw a 33.8 percent decrease.

The lowest rate of retention for African American males at DePauw in the last two decades came with the incoming class of 1992. Of the 13 students that entered, five, or 38.5 percent, graduated.

DePauw had its highest rate with the incoming class of 1997. Of that class's 15 students, 13 graduated.

As reported, the average retention rate of African American males at DePauw still exceeds the national average, which the U.S. Department of Education says is well below 50 percent.

The number of African American men enrolling at DePauw has also increased, however slight, over the last two decades.