Ferid Murad Medal and Walker Cup Finalists Announced

913

Since 1922, The Walker Cup has awarded graduating seniors who are “judged to have contributed the most to the university during his four-year collegiate career.” Three finalists are selected by their peers in the senior class, then department chairs vote and make recommendations to the university President, who makes the final selection. The winner will also be announced on April 25 at the Academic Awards Convocation. He or she must also give an address to the senior class during the commencement ceremony.

The Ferid Murad Medal, named after DePauw graduate and Nobel laureate Dr. Ferid Murad ’58, recognizes one senior who has had the most significant scholarly and/or artistic achievements at DePauw. After department chairs, program directors, a representative from the School of Music and the dean who oversees independent majors nominates those to be considered for the award, the Faculty Development Committee nominates three finalists. The Vice President of Academic Affairs will make the final selection and announce the recipient on April 25 at the Academic Awards Convocation.

The DePauw had a chance to sit down with these six finalists to hear what they had to say about this recent honor.

 

Kevin Bugielski is both a Holton Memorial Scholar and a Civic Fellow, as well as an English writing major and Education Studies minor from Oak Park, Ill. Bugielski served as a first-year mentor his sophomore year, then a Peer Mentor Program Specialist his junior and senior years. Bugielski was named a Men’s Hall Achievement Scholar, and he eventually released a campaign entitled “DePauw Human Rights,” in which a space was created for students, faculty and staff to engage in conversations regarding race, sexual orientation, feminism and nationwide happenings. Bugielski contributed to both DePauw Dialogue and DePauw Dialogue 2.0. Upon graduation, Bugielski will move to New York City to join “The Gotham Group,” a marketing agency where he will serve as Creative Brand Strategist.

The DePauw (TDP): How do you feel about being a finalist for the Walker Cup?

Kevin Bugielski (KB): To be completely honest, I am still in shock. When I first received the news, my heart began pounding with excitement and I started to cry. I was able to pull myself together in order to call my mother, but after sharing the news with her, there wasn't a dry eye from either of us.  I am so beyond humbled and honored to be a finalist for this year's Walker Cup, and I still can't believe it. I have done quite a lot of introspection after hearing the news, and I can't help but think back on the amazing relationships that I was able to form here at DePauw. I get my energy and enthusiasm from all of you, and my love for DePauw and everything I have done here runs deep. I am forever honored, grateful and thankful to my amazing classmates and friends for nominating me for this award.

TDP: What will you do if you win this award?

KB: Oh wow, I really haven't even thought that far. I'm still very much in the humbled and excited mindset, and I hope those feelings last a lifetime. But, I'll say this much: If I'm lucky enough to win this award, I will be so beyond exhilarated to address the Class of 2016 at commencement. If I don't win, that's completely fine, too! I didn't get involved at DePauw in order to win this award...I did it because I was passionate about every single thing I participated in, and because I truly wanted to leave DePauw better than I found it. It's my hope that by the time graduation comes around, I'll be able to say that I have.

TDP: How do you think this honor will affect your future after DePauw?

KB: I loved DePauw before this award, and I will continue to love DePauw after this award. Regardless of whether or not I win this year's Walker Cup, I promise to stay committed to making DePauw a better place. Whether that's returning for DePauw Dialogue 3.0, donating my time and assistance to Cara Setchell and the Mentor Program or starting a program for alumni to continue conversations about race, religion, sexual orientation and economic or social status in the real world, DePauw is and will always be my passion. In terms of it affecting my real world endeavors after graduation, I definitely think it will be a constant reminder for me to work as hard as I possibly can. With whatever I choose to get involved with after I cross that stage, I just hope that I can complete it with as much passion and love as the things I was able to complete here.

Class of 2016, we've got about a month left...let's make the most of it! Love you all, and thank you for this honor.

 

Katie Kondry, the student body vice president, is an economics major and a political science and philosophy double minor from Naperville, Ill. Her sophomore year, Kondry pushed for the creation of the Intercultural Community Conservation Facilitator (ICCF) program and sustainable to-go containers. She also served as a Status Quo and ICCF Facilitator, as well as a student representative of CAPP. Kondry will join BMO Harris Bank as a Commercial Analyst in Chicago.

The DePauw (TDP): How did you feel about being nominated for the Walker Cup?

Katie Kondry (KK): I was initially quite shocked to hear that I had been nominated as a Walker Cup finalist. Much of what I do on campus involves work that is often done behind the scenes, so to know that I made a positive contribution to the experiences of my peers is extremely humbling. I can think of a good twenty seniors who are deserving of this award, so I'm very honored. It's been a cool experience to come full circle and reflect on the memories I've made and the changes I've encountered at DePauw over the last four years.

TDP: What will you do if you win this award? 

KK: To be perfectly honest, I haven't thought much past the nomination process. I suppose I would sit down and get to work on a graduation speech. At the end of the day, I'm not that concerned with who wins the cup. While it's human nature to desire accolades and recognition, I've come to learn that it's both our ability to dream big and the journey we forge towards reaching our goals that ultimately matter. The real satisfaction comes in knowing that I, along with many, many members of the Class of 2016, helped affect positive change that leaves DePauw (hopefully) better than we found it. Kevin was one of my first friends at DePauw and Craig has been such an instrumental part of my support system this year that I will be so incredibly happy for and proud of whoever wins. 

TDP: How do you think this honor will affect your future after DePauw? 

KK: DePauw has taught me so much over the past four years that I feel an immense sense of indebtedness and gratitude to all who helped shape my DePauw experience and contribute to my overall intellectual growth. Most importantly, I think I've walked away with a better understanding of who I am and what I stand for. I've learned that grit and determination go a long way in achieving incremental change and that we can solve complex problems if we work together. I've always made it a priority to help better the communities around me and I hope to continue doing so while working as a financial analyst in Chicago. Women are still vastly underrepresented in both the boardroom and our legislatures, so I'm looking forward to the work that lies ahead. I suppose this honor serves as further encouragement and motivation to both push the boundaries of our conventional norms and to empower those around me to challenge the status quo. 

 

Student body President Craig Carter is a biology major from Chicago’s south side. Carter played football his freshman year and became the president of Men of Excellence, as well as a first-year resident assistant, his sophomore year. His junior year, Carter was elected Vice President of Community Relations for DePauw Student Government. In this position, he aided the revitalization of the Association of African American Students’ mentorship program for Greencastle youth and DePauw students. Carter’s commitment to cross-cultural discussion and love for the DePauw community can be reflected by his organization of DePauw Dialogue 2.0. Carter hopes to pursue a PhD in biology and eventually become president of a small liberal arts college like DePauw.

The DePauw (TDP): How do you feel about being a finalist for the Walker Cup?

Craig Carter (CC): I am honored that the class of 2016, which is full of bright and captivating leaders, nominated me to be a finalist for the Walker Cup. It is a humbling experience to know that my peers believe in my ability to create change and lead our campus. But I want to make clear that, without the dedication of the entire DePauw community, I would not be in the position I find myself today.

TDP: What will you do if you win this award?

CC: If I am found qualified to win the Walker Cup, I will first thank everyone that has aided me in becoming the man I am today. Winning, however, would not mean the end of my service to DePauw and its many amazing students, faculty and staff. There is still much work to be done before year's end and I hope to put our future leaders in the best position possible to succeed.

TDP: How do you think this honor will affect your future after DePauw?

CC: Whether or not I win, my service as student body president has allowed me to see that there is an overwhelming need for unity in all our communities on campus, which cannot be repaired with an award. From an alumni position, I will continue my efforts to further better DePauw for all that reside on our campus. It is the duty of every member of the DePauw family to not simply leave, but to give back in our absence.

 

Sheridan Schulte, a biochemistry and history double major with minors in French and European studies from Houston, Texas, intends to pursue a career in medicine. She served as president of Timmy Global Health through her junior and senior years, in addition to working with Dr. Sharon Crary in the biochemistry department to create a diagnostic test for the tropical disease, leishmaniasis. Her goal is to become an obstetrician and gynecologist and use her public health background working for a global health nonprofit organization with a focus on women’s health and empowerment.

The DePauw (TDP): How do you feel about being a finalist for the Ferid Murad medal?

Sheridan Schulte (SS): I am incredibly honored to be a finalist for this award, especially the more I learn about what past Ferid Murad medal winners have accomplished. I think it shows that hard work really does pay off.

TDP: What will you do if you win this award?

SS: The first thing I would do is thank my DePauw professors who always challenged me to think outside of the box and be a better student and thinker.

TDP: How do you think this honor will affect your future after DePauw?

SS: To me, the Ferid Murad medal is about pushing yourself as much as possible in your chosen field. I know I will continue to always strive to be the best that I can be, and I will carry this drive with my in my career as a physician and public health practitioner.

 

Megan Bailey is a political science major, a Rector Scholar and an Honor Scholar from Columbus, Ind. Her sophomore year, she interned at the Sagamore Institute, where she worked on research projects, such as her “Mapping Ohio’s Compassion,” a project for the Governors Office of Ohio in which she analyzed data relating to Ohio’s nonprofits. This year, Bailey completed two theses, one examining securitization theory regarding the refugee crisis in the European Union, the other examining women’s roles in conflict using the Democratic Republic of Congo as a case study. Bailey will work in Indianapolis at KSM Consulting. Afterward, she intends to pursue a Masters degree in international security.

The DePauw (TDP): How do you feel about being a finalist for the Ferid Murad medal?

Megan Bailey (MB): I am absolutely honored to be a finalist for the Ferid Murad medal. My nomination came as a surprise to me, so it was very humbling to know that my professors and my department see me as that kind of exceptional student. I also know the other two finalists (we were all actually on the same floor freshman year), and they are wonderfully driven and intelligent individuals. To be considered alongside them is a great honor.

TDP: What will you do if you win this award?

MB: Honestly, not much will change if I win this award. I’ll update my resume...? The award is a great honor, but it won’t change what kind of student I am or what I strive towards.

TDP: How do you think this honor will affect your future after DePauw?

MB: Just being nominated for this award will have effects for me after DePauw. For two years after graduation, I’ll be working in Indianapolis at KSM Consulting as part of the Orr Fellowship. After the fellowship ends, I plan to attend graduate school in international security and human rights. Having an award of this caliber under my belt certainly strengthens my application and will show my future graduate programs that I am well qualified.

 

From West Lafayette, Ind., Sydney Cason is a neuroscience major, an Honor Scholar and a Peer Mentor. As a first-year, Cason held leading roles in two operas during her time in the School of Music, then created the independent major in neuroscience, combining multiple fields of thought. She co-founded the Neuroscience Education and Research at DePauw (NERD), in addition to being one of the 2,000 individuals nationwide selected for the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Cason plans to attend the University of Pennsylvania next fall and pursue a career with a focus on the aging brain and neurodegenerative diseases.

The DePauw (TDP): How do you feel about being a finalist for the Ferid Murad medal?

Sydney Cason (SC): I am honored and humbled to be nominated and, now, a finalist.

TDP: What will you do if you win this award?

SC: I will be so grateful and thrilled to win. Not really sure what I will do though.